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http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/18/mapping-discord-creating-a-primer-on-the-arab-world/

In the spring semester of 2010 the Outreach Center put on a workshop looking at Hip Hop in the Middle East region and Africa, and this Online Resource is one of the culminations of that interdisciplinary academic inquiry. The workshop particularly focused on emergent global forms of Hip Hop culture that provide unique points of access into contemporary socio-cultural currents in the Middle East region. Some of the inspiration for this inquiry and initiative, which also comprised a Hip Hop performance on campus with Syrian-American artist Omar Offendum and a visit to a local High School by the Arabic Hip Hop Palestinian artists, DAM, is an appreciation for how contemporary art in general, and Hip Hop in particular, can generate unique learning opportunities about the Middle East region for students in America. There is a broad range of applications and uses of Hip Hop for secondary school courses including inquiries into contemporary issues and politics, youth culture and resistance narratives, race and gender politics, national [and trans-national] identity, globalization and media, literature and linguistics, and art and culture.

http://cmes.hmdc.harvard.edu/outreach/hiphopresource

A Group Project Abroad (GPA) by Carol Bacon

Topic: History, Social Studies, Geography

Subject: Where in the World is Morocco?

Duration of lesson: 3-50 minute lessons

Grade Level: K-5

Rationale: The students will develop an understanding of Africa and its diversity; and an understanding of Moroccan culture and geographic features.

Lesson Objective: The students will analyze and interpret maps of Africa, Morocco, California, and the Moroccan flag to learn important facts.

Download File: FullModuleCarol.pdf

http://uclafulbrightmorocco.blogspot.com/

Thirteen U.S. teachers blog from Morocco about their experiences in a five-week seminar with the UCLA African Studies Center, sponsored by the Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad program.

In this lesson, students will learn about a group of people and their desire to return to their homeland, many of whom have been refugees for nearly 30 years. The struggle of the Sahrawi people to claim Western Sahara introduces students to the idea that the security of home and a place to live is not something to be taken for granted. The women and children fled Western Sahara to live in Algeria in 1976. Since that time, they have struggled to organize themselves, bring education and health care to their people, and increase international awareness of their plight. In 2000, the National Union of the Sahrawi Women started a race, the Sahara Marathon, to publicize their situation and bring resources to their community. In this lesson, students will visit a series of Web sites to learn about the history of the Sahrawi people, their relationship with neighboring countries, their lives as refugees, and how these women have used their power to organize and obtain the resources they need to thrive in such a hostile environment.

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/wideangle/classroom/3lp2.html

Grade: 7th – 10th Grade
Brief Description: Migration is a recurring theme in world history. Students will recognize the complex interactions between groups of people who come in contact with one another, using the Aryan migration into India and the current conflict in Darfur. They should be able to explain that conflicts in these areas have many causes including the relationship between agrarians and pastoralists.

Objectives:
1) Students will be able to identify that the effects of migration are evident in both ancient and
contemporary cultures
2) Students will be able to define “pastoralist” and “agrarian” and explain the relationships between these groups of people.
3) Students should be able to make some connections between the migrations of the Aryans and the settling down of pastoralists in Sudan.

Lesson Plan

GRADES: 9-12 (More appropriate for the higher-level and AP courses.)

DESCRIPTION: This lesson plan will address the current crisis in the Sudan and Darfur.

The history, including economic history, imperializing of the area, and migration patterns will have already been studied. Current issues with internal disruptions are the focus of this lesson.

TIME: one block period or two traditional class periods

Lesson Plan

Aicha is a Senegalese second grader from a local village outside of Dakar. Students have already been introduced to Aicha earlier in the year and understand that she lives in a village. Ballel has also been introduced as Aicha’s cousin, also Senegalese, but living in Dakar.

Description: Aicha visits her cousin Ballel in the city of Dakar, spending the weekend, and taking a tour of the city in search of items to prepare Ceebu jen a national dish which can be eaten after going to la mosquée on Saturdays. The items needed for the dish can be found at Le Marché Sandaga.
Time: One to two weeks based on 30 minutes lessons three times per week.

Objectives: Students will visit le Marche Sandaga to purchase items needed for Ceebu jen , a flavorsome marinated fish cooked with tomato paste and a variety of vegetables. Student will also use basic French phrases to communicate with the merchants.

Lesson Plan

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