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The North Carolina Center for South Asia Studies (NCCSAS) is a consortium made up of Duke, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The consortium promotes education and research across the disciplines, drawing on faculty who have a focus on South Asia in fields as diverse as anthropology, religious studies, and history, to business, global health, and policy studies. We work to raise awareness of the region across the consortium campuses and in the community at large.

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http://www.jewelofmuscat.tv/

This website has been launched by the governments of Oman and Singapore to cover the construction and voyage of a 9th-century Arab sailing ship.

A team of experts has built the Jewel of Muscat in a specially constructed shipyard on the beach in Qantab in Oman. They are using a range of historical sources, including archaeological findings from the ‘Belitung Wreck’, including the Tang Treasure, which was discovered in 1998 in Indonesia waters.

The ship has been constructed with the methods available to 9th-century Arab craftsmen. The planks have been sewn together using coconut fibre, and the square sails will be made of plaited palm leaves.

Once constructed, the ship set sail on an historic journey from Oman to Singapore.

Grade: 7th – 10th Grade
Brief Description: Migration is a recurring theme in world history. Students will recognize the complex interactions between groups of people who come in contact with one another, using the Aryan migration into India and the current conflict in Darfur. They should be able to explain that conflicts in these areas have many causes including the relationship between agrarians and pastoralists.

Objectives:
1) Students will be able to identify that the effects of migration are evident in both ancient and
contemporary cultures
2) Students will be able to define “pastoralist” and “agrarian” and explain the relationships between these groups of people.
3) Students should be able to make some connections between the migrations of the Aryans and the settling down of pastoralists in Sudan.

Lesson Plan

Target Grade Levels:
Grades 7-12

Themes:
Conflict, Peace

Students role-play peace talks between India and Pakistan and examine related political, social and economic issues.

http://www.pbs.org/frontlineworld/educators/history_pakistan.html

http://www.pbs.org/frontlineworld/watch/player.html?pkg=rc78iran&seg=1&mod

In this lesson series, students will become aware of the history of the Middle East, including U.S. policy interests in the region, the history of colonialism and military conflict, and the current issues that impact the political, social, cultural, religious, economic and diplomatic landscapes. Students will be encouraged to discuss their views on these topics, to think outside-of-the-box, and even to formulate their own policy solutions to some of the ongoing conflicts involved.

Particular attention will be paid to:

• Iraq

• Iran

• Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

• Sunni/Shiite Divide,

• Lebanon, Hezbollah and Israel (including the military conflict in 2006)

• The role of Saudi Arabia in the region

• Other key players – including (but not limited to) Syria, Egypt, the Arab League, and OPEC

Middle East Lesson Plan Middle East Lesson Plan (59K) [download]

http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/islamtibet/indexit.htm

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